The 1987 Suzuki LT-4WD QuadRunner: A 4WD That Reaches New Heights

We all our favorites: our 1987 Suzuki has been with me since childhood. From the cabin, to the farm, to plowing snow, to pulling trailers, to super-low diff lock its arguably the most reliable and best ATV ever made. No chains. No belts. Well loved.

A goal is to make this a resource to keep these machines alive.
More to come with specific tips, facts, and information specific to the:

  • LT-4WD 1987-1998 Suzuki QuadRunner 250
  • LT-F250F 1999-2002 Suzuki QuadRunner 250 – newer body style
  • LT-F4WDX 1991-1998 Suzuki King Quad 300 [300cc]
  • LT-F300F 1999-2002 Suzuki King Quad 300 [300cc] – newer body style

“Tackle the tough terrain in four-wheel drive, or switch easily to two-wheel drive using the dash mounted lever and discover what it can really do. The front differential can even be locked when in super low range for extra traction on snow, mud and ice.”

Suzuki lived up to the ads. I purchased NOS brochures and the official Suzuki Service Manual off eBay a few years ago and scanned them in an attempt to preserve history. The ad at the top was the first year: 1987 model pictures. Square axle nut boots (cone shaped all other years ), silver skid plate up front (black all other years), and the only year with the flip up/down front and rear racks.
The LT-4WD had a retail price of $3298.00.

Here was the sales brochure from 1995:

Amazingly you can still [supposedly] purchase the King Quad 300 new in Australia; some 29 years after the original King Quad 300 was introduced and a full 34 years after the QuadRunner 250.

“The LT-4WD was able to give off-road enthusiast the ability to explore new limits on the trails or around the farm. The LT-4WD was the beginning of the sport-utility ATV at Suzuki.”

easy2boot gets better and better

Be safe. Stay home. While working longer days now, COVID-19 has given an opportunity to brain dump topics I have been meaning to properly document.

Case-and-point: easy2boot is wonderful. You can boot literally anything off a USB stick. Windows 10 unattended? Yes. Name-your-partition-ISO? Yes. Tivo MFS Tools for hard drive cloning? Yes. Linux flavors? Absolutely. Random PCs that only do BIOS updates via ISO? Yes. And the list goes on… I use it almost daily and support the developer.

Hard to believe its been almost 5 years since relying on easy2boot. 2015 Post: easy2boot & WSUS Offline; a must-have USB stick for Technology professionals

In the past few months, easy2boot can now UEFI Secure Boot a Windows 10 Recovery Environment from a FAT32 secondary partition, from there you can swap in an .imgPTN file (now .imgPTN23), reboot, and now load whatever OS you choose from UEFI Secure Boot. Brilliant!

The easy2boot site does a superb job in documenting technical details however that is partly the challenge; its a lot to understand. My use case: an all-power bootable USB stick for Windows installations and WinRE to swap in-and-out different versions. I prefer two identical USB drives for redundancy. Two 64GB USB3.0 all-metal key-chain drives.

  • Download the latest version (as of writing: Easy2Boot_v2.00A_password_is_e2b.zip)
  • Make a new USB stick.
    As of v2.00, “The main change is that when you make a new drive, it will now download the agFM files and copy them to the second FAT32 partition (if present). This allows UEFI-booting to the agFM grub2 File Manager system. All thanks to ‘a1ive’ for developing his grub2 branch and agFM.”
    Make_E2B.exe and Make_E2B_USB_drive.cmd – downloads agFM if 2nd FAT32 partition is made. If drive is <128Gib then 2nd FAT32 partition of approx 500MB is automatically made.
  • Because my USB drives are 64GB, I resize (enlarge) the secondary FAT32 partition to ~1.2GB in size to handle the WinRE image [next step].
  • Add nodelay
  • Add “No key (choose a version to install).xml” to the _ISO\WINDOWS\WIN10\ and _ISO\WINDOWS\WIN7\ directories if not already present. These answer files allow for the “Repair” option.
  • Copy Win10 ISOs (I always keep a few builds handy; both x86 and x64 combo)
  • Copy Win7 USB3 ISO (if you have a reason; helpful still for in-place upgrades for activation)
  • Copy Windows 10 x64 v1909 Injected.imgPTN23. The .imgPTN23 file extension is important. Follow the Adding UEFI/.imgPTN images guide carefully; specifically the “To convert an ISO to .imgPTN file for UEFI-booting” section.
  • Copy Win10XPE_x64.ISO to the root of your secondary FAT32 partition. This is what you can UEFI boot. You have to make this .ISO file; use Win10PE utility to do it.

Enjoy easy2boot! Its quite wonderful and actively developed. Please support the developer who probably spends a good percentage of their life on this project.